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Colliding Coworkers

When coworkers don’t get along, it can make for a very awkward place to work for everybody involved. Unfortunately it can have a trickle down effect and sabotage the health of the corporate culture. Action needs to be taken by management to clear the situation before further damage is done.

Practical Practice Management

Disagreement

I have said it many times before today, when you are working with people you will always have people problems.  There is just no getting around it.  If it is not personalities that “rub” then it will be  work styles, general attitude or beliefs.

We are humans and we are different, this is a wonderful thing, yet it can be a great division among coworkers.

As a manager what do you do when co-workers have conflict?

What if one of your staff members complains about another staff member to you, how do you handle it?

We know that there will be people at work that we just do not “click” with, but what do you do if to you the situation becomes intolerable for one or more employees because of another employee?

As a manager do you have a “line” drawn that coworkers would need to cross before you step…

View original post 105 more words

The Lollipop Moment

My daughter is in grade seven and just made house captain. She’s thrilled by this honor. Her teachers and peers say she was chosen not for her outstanding popularity or nor her ability to influence others by extroverted behavior. Her most outstanding leadership characteristics have been demonstrated every year since Kindergarten in her ability to take her own initiative and to lead by example.  Today, she showed me this TEDx video that truly resonated with me on the theme of leadership. My daughter is totally inspired by the concept that leadership can take light in the everyday, ordinary world.

It’s in the small stuff where one can make the biggest differences.  Leadership can thereby be found in every individual. It is in the art of these small, lollipop moments that the biggest impacts on people can be made. This is a good challenge for us all to regularly have our lollipop moments by giving them naturally without premeditation or agenda.

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Job Search tips – part 2

Consider the following guidelines when when beginning a new position.  These guidelines will ensure a positive experience for yourself as well as for the company you chose to work for.business suit

‘on the job’ tips

  • Be sure to be a few minutes early on the first day on the job to familiarize yourself with the office environment and routine. (up to fifteen minutes early is sufficient)
  • Confirm dress code prior to first day on the job. If ever unsure of dress code it is better to be more corporately dressed.
  • Maintain a positive attitude and outlook at all times. This will help you naturally turn problems into opportunities.
  • Plan to have at least one or two relevant questions or statements to ask or comment on during the orientation or training session. This will confirm your interest in the role and the company in general.
  • Come to the first day on the job with a pen and notebook to take notes on new details and general information. Ensure you are clear on any position details.  Ask questions—don’t assume.
  • Send a thank you card to the person that offered you the position. As mentioned in Part 1, in the internet age, this will certainly help you stand out in the long term.
  • Be proactive – if you have completed your assigned work, ask for additional work.
  • Respect company and employee confidentiality regarding any information you learn about the company, other employees’ salaries as well as your own.  Compensation (your own or others) is to be held in strict confidence.
  • If you feel that you ever experience unprofessional behaviour from a peer or manager consider the whole situation and any trends. Once you have done this, look to speak confidentially with the Human Resource Manager.
  • It is not always easy being ‘the new guy’, but your positive outlook will always help you get through.

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photo credit: _Davo_

Job Search tips – part 1

Consider the following guidelines when going on a job interview. shaking hands These guidelines will ensure a positive experience for yourself as well as for the company you chose to work for.

Interview tips

  • Be on time.  Intend to arrive a few minutes early to a job interview (but no more than 10 minutes)
  • Dress professionally and show a positive attitude. Do not underestimate the importance and impact of professional image. If ever unsure of dress code it is better to be more corporately dressed on the first meeting.
  • Research the company before meeting with the company representative. Plan to have at least one or two relevant questions to ask during the meeting.
  • Employers want to surround their teams with positive people. Always speak positively about past employers and team members or even yourself. Any negativity or discussion of ‘personality conflict’ will not be looked upon favourably. It is better to talk about highlight points and if a discussion about a ‘challenge’ comes up in the interview always look to find the ‘positive outcome’ that you learned from it or that may have resulted from it. (as this can sometimes be a challenging topic consider your response to this in advance of the interview)
  • Take notes during an interview if appropriate and ensure you are clear on any position details.  Ask questions—don’t assume.
  • Send a thank you card to the person that interviewed you. In the internet age, this will certainly help you stand out. Be sure to double check for any spelling or grammatical errors before sending.

Labour Day

This coming Monday September 2nd is Labour Day, a national holiday in Canada and the U.S. This day is the workers’ holiday celebrating their labour efforts.

You can thank some union workers who worked in a printing shop in Ontario in the 1800’s for this annual long weekend.

English: Toronto Globe newspaper office (with ...

Toronto Globe newspaper office (with a globe on top) on King Street East, Toronto, Canada, early 1860s. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1869 the union petitioned their employers, requesting a weekly reduction in working hours. Their request was refused outright by the owners of the printing shops, and by the founder of the Toronto Globe, which later became the Globe and Mail.

In 1872 the Toronto Printers Union went on strike and fought for a 9 hour work day. Previously the employers expected their workers to clock in a 12 hour work day.

After that year, almost all union demands included the 54-hour week. The Toronto printers were pioneers of the shorter workweek in North America.

Celebrating the workers’ successful striking efforts, Labour Day became an annual celebration. By 1894, it became the official national holiday that we continue to recognize today.

Here’s an ironic twist. For the first time ever, The Globe and Mail newspaper will not be publishing a Labour Day edition of their paper this year, due to lack of advertising revenue. According to a note to subscribers from the publisher and CEO of the Globe & Mail, the revenue is “needed to cover the costs of formatting, printing and delivery of the paper, and the number of vacation stops by subscribers”.

Enjoy your long weekend, and of course, this Labour Day.

What Keeps Customers Coming Back?

Practical Practice Management

waitress serving customers

Whether you work in a retail store, restaurant, doctor’s office, or some other industry that has customers, you know that it is the customer that pays your salary.  Consumers have the choice, most of the time, as to where they go for services, or supplies.  As a business person once they are in your door, on your phone or find you via the internet, the idea is to keep them coming back.

Of course you need to make sure that what you serve or sell must be above the standard that your customers are looking for.  After that it is the service that they receive that makes them continue to choose your business over the others that are out there.

One way employees can help keep customers coming back is to develop their personal signature to put on their work.  In the office that I work in, Jesus our front…

View original post 264 more words