Tag Archives: Matt Corker

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Most popular McNak blog posts of 2012

‘Tis the season for reflection, so in that spirit, here is a quick snapshot of our most popular blog articles for 2012:

Co-founder of McNak, Sarah McNeill was smileyfacecaptivated by this TED Talk video of Shawn Achor’s about the happy secret to better work. Check out Happiness Inspires Productivity.

A guest post written by one of our friends at MAC Marketing Solutions, The Importance of Teamwork and Positive Energy in the Workplace was one of our most viewed posts of 2012.

At this time of year, we think about making some changes in our lives. Perhaps What you do first thing in the morning matters will inspire you.

The subject of onboarding proves to be a popular one. McNak co-founder Cheryl Nakamoto describes What went wrong: a lesson about onboarding in this notable post.

And one of the favourites among our team at McNak is Does Your Culture Create a Legacy? – a guest post written by the eloquent Matt Corker.

This year the McNak blog has attracted more followers, likes, and comments. We’d like take this opportunity to thank you all for taking the time to read, comment and share our articles.

Happy New Year!

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Leave the Door Open

When I was little, I was taught about responsibility by owning pets. First it was goldfish, then it was lizards and salamanders that I picked up from the forest behind my house before I graduated onto hamsters, and then to dogs.

The hamsters taught me a lot about uncertainty.

See, they lived in a cage.
It looked the same day in and day out. That spinning wheel stayed in the same place every day. The cage always had two floors to it. They got food and water from the same spot.

They explored that cage every day as if it was new to them. As if that wheel was finally gonna break them free and that food finally going to taste that much better.

When I would open the cage door, to “set them free,” they ran – ran to a safe spot in their cage or that awkward place under the ladder where I couldn’t reach them. They dug into the wood chips. They hid. They flared their teeth at me. They became scared of leaving the same cage they were held captive in.

The only way they would come out was to wait. I waited until they calmed down, regained that sense of curiosity about their surroundings, and found the open door themselves. And there I would be, ready to pat and play with the happy little critters as they ran around our living room floor.

When I am introduced to new situations at work, new people, or new development distinctions, I can sometimes become that hamster – digging into my own jail and hiding in fear from what I don’t know.
The magic happens when I discover the newness “on my own.”
It resonates more with me.
I make it an adventure.
It builds up my confidence in handling the unknown.

When we want to set another person free, just leave the door open.

This guest post was written by Matt Corker –  International Operations Specialist, lululemon athletica

Matt Corker has a serious addiction to big ideas, bold goals, and strong communities. After working for the University of British Columbia in alumni and student affairs, Matt was drawn to lululemon athletica – a yoga-inspired athletic apparel company that creates components for people to live long, healthy, and fun lives. After working first in Leadership Development creating opportunities _MG_6446that empower their great staff to achieve their dreams and live a life they LOVE, he moved into a new role supporting the global goals of the company. Matt has a Bachelor of Commerce in Human Resource Management and International Business from the Sauder School of Business at UBC and his MBA from the Copenhagen Business School in Denmark. He has a strong background in leadership and development and a big heart for new technologies, inspiring minds, and giving out great high fives. More information about Matt can be found at http://thatsacorker.com.

Does Your Culture Create A Legacy?

Every day we are either making or breaking habits. Research tells us that in 21 days we have the ability to create new habits or reinforce old ones.

Enter the corporate culture – the breeding ground of new habits, practices, and behaviours. In 21 days, a corporate culture could, in theory, be able to deconstruct old habits or build up new ones.

That is a powerful tool in my opinion.
Think about it. Our companies could be responsible for building habits that could create a huge shift in people’s personal lives and, in effect, the world.

We could create habits of sustainable consumption by only allowing reusable containers in the office. Goodbye garbage cans filled with green and white cups and take-away boxes!

We could create habits of intentional time management and goal setting by ensuring every meeting request is sent with an end goal. “By the end of the meeting, we should be have completed y and z.”

We could create habits of integrating work-life-play by introducing flexible working hours, team off-sites where significant others and best friends could be invited to join for part of it, or meetings that include attending a fitness class together. Would people then need to “reacquaint themselves” with their family and friends or healthy lifestyle come the weekend?

We could create habits of generosity and benevolence by allowing each employee the option of having part of their pay automatically donated to a charity of their choice. What if our motto was “we pay you more so that you can donate more”?

Our world contains over consumption, obesity, unsustainable lifestyles, families that never see each other, depression, disease, “lost souls” looking for a purpose, bullying, and difficult or limited access to education and clean water.

A question we should all be asking ourselves is “Does my corporate culture create habits in our people that will advance the world in a meaningful way?”
My wish is that the answer is yes. If it isn’t, its our responsibility as leaders to do something about it.

What legacy is your company leaving?

This guest post was written by Matt Corker.

Matt Corker has a serious addiction to big ideas, bold goals, and strong communities. After working for the University of British Columbia in alumni and student affairs, Matt was drawn to lululemon athletica – a yoga-inspired athletic apparel company that creates components for people to live long, healthy, and fun lives. In his role of Leadership Development Advisor, Matt was responsible for delivering new-hire orientations, overseeing their internship program, and creating professional development opportunities that empower their great staff to achieve their dreams and live a life they LOVE! Matt has a Bachelor of Commerce in Human Resource Management and International Business from the Sauder School of Business at UBC and is now completing his MBA at the Copenhagen Business School in Denmark. He has a big heart for new technologies, inspiring minds, and giving out great high fives. More information about Matt can be found at http://thatsacorker.com.

Cause Ya Gotta Have Faith

People, and therefore companies, have little faith these days. Faith being the unwavering belief in another people’s ability or plan to create something great. This can be a teammate, a family member, or even themselves.

Instead, they have facts. Facts about what worked well last year, what skills someone has demonstrated, and about what experiences people bring to the table.

The interesting thing is that these facts are all based in the past. Past success, past performance, past experience. With little faith, these past-based facts can begin to drive future business decisions.

“The team tried that last year and didn’t see any results, so let’s try a different approach.”
“You haven’t proven yourself yet, so I’m not going to give you this upcoming project.”
“That candidate doesn’t come with any experience in our field, so he probably won’t be of any benefit to us.”

The past dictates our future when we solely rely on facts.

Faith, on the other hand, doesn’t need proof or evidence from the past. It doesn’t compare where we are today to where we were. Instead, it looks to where we could be and creates a path from here to there.

In this environment, be it at home, at work, or in the gym, you are surrounded by trust, confidence, and inspiration. You innovate constantly as there is always a new future to be created. You dream big dreams and then turn them into goals. You develop your people before they prove themselves “worthy enough” for that development. You hire based on cultural fit. You take big risks and see what sticks.

For some, running your life (or company) based completely on faith is unbelievable.
For others, it’s the only thing that works.

This guest post was written by Matt Corker, Leadership Development Advisor at lululemon athletica

Matt Corker has a serious addiction to big ideas, bold goals, and strong communities. After working for the University of British Columbia in alumni and student affairs, Matt was drawn to lululemon athletica – a yoga-inspired athletic apparel company that creates components for people to live longer, healthier, more fun lives. In his role of Leadership Development Advisor, Matt is responsible for delivering new-hire orientations and professional development opportunities that empower their great staff to achieve their dreams and live a life they LOVE! Matt has a Bachelor of Commerce in Human Resource Management and International Business from the Sauder School of Business at UBC and will be starting his MBA at the Copenhagen Business School in the fall. He has a strong background in leadership and development and a big heart for social media, inspiring minds, and giving out great high fives. More information about Matt can be found at http://thatsacorker.com.